Hillforts in Latvia

Today is the ‘Birthday of Latvia’, as my little son proudly announced to me coming from the kindergarten. Moreover, I was putting some spit and polish on my article about medieval castles in Latvia, so I found a collection of maps listing Latvian hillforts particularly useful.

Hillforts or castle mounds (pilskalns in Latvian, literally meaning ‘častle’ or ‘fort’ on a hill) is not the same as your typical medieval castle. For one thing, they appear early, dating back to the Neolithic period, and disappear from the Latvian landscape around the thirteenth-fourteenth centuries. On the other hand, they are so closely related to the later stone castles, both geographically (often occupying the same site) and historically that I believe they should be studied together.

Daugmales%20pilskalns

Daugmale Hillfort – a reconstruction

So, here is the link, feel free to explore and admire, and be sure to visit at least one of them when you have a chance. In a much earlier post I did, in fact, describe my own impressions from one of the most famous hillforts in Latvia, Daugmales pilskalns – according to some of my compatriots, Daugmales pilskalns is in the top ten list of Latvian hillforts – and so it should be.

Source: Latvijas pilskalnu kartes

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About thegrailquest

Anastasija Ropa holds a doctoral degree from Bangor University (North Wales), for a study in medieval and modern Arthurian literature. She has published a number of articles on medieval and modern Arthurian literature, focusing on its historical and artistic aspects. She is currently employed as guest lecturer at the Latvian Academy of Sport Education. Anastasija’s most recent research explores medieval equestrianism in English and French literary art and literature, and she is also engaged as part-time volunteer horse-trainer. In a nutshell: Lecturer at the Latvian Academy of Sport Education Graduate of the School of English, University of Wales, Bangor. Graduate of the University of Latvia Passionate about history, particularly the Middle Ages A horse-lover and horse-owner
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